Bobby Driscoll with Captain Flint

My previous post was all about Walt Disney and his family in Norton Disney Lincolnshire, when he were over here overseeing the filming of Treasure Island in 1949.  This item covers the actual film :-

I have just come across this wonderful still – a publicity still from Treasure Island 1950 (  film released in 1950)

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Bobby Driscoll came over here for a few months in mid 1949 to star in the Disney film – made at Denham Film Studios. Apparently he had to get a work permit and had difficulty with this but when he did, it was for a limited time. Consequently all the scenes that he played in had to be completed quite quickly so he would comply with the Government regulation at the time. This was, after all, only 4 years after the end of the war.

Actually I do think that his parents were taken to court over his outstaying this period – and below is information I have located on this situation :-

Treasure Island was filmed in the United Kingdom, and during production it was discovered that Bobby Driscoll did not have a valid British work permit, so his family and Disney were fined and ordered to leave the country. They were allowed to remain for six weeks to prepare an appeal, during which director Byron Haskin hastily shot all of Driscoll’s close-ups,using his British stand-in to film missing location scenes after he and his parents had returned to California

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Walt Disney in Lincolnshire

Dated 30 July 1949 – as reported the events of Walt’s brief visit.

Walt Disney and his Family at Norton Disney Lincolnshire

Norton Disney, Lincolnshire, England.

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Above : Walt’s Two Daughters at Norton Disney

Walt Disney's Wife and Daughter at Norton Disney July 1949

Above: Walt Disney’s Wife Lilian and Daughter at Norton Disney, Lincolnshire in July 1949

Walt, his wife and two daughters arrived just after lunch in the village.  Walt had scratched in his diary before strolling off to point his cine-camera around the village – and these are stills taken from that colour film.  Other fading photographs show Walt absorbed in the search for facts about his family name at the village of Norton Disney just West of Lincoln.

From what I can find out Walt and family were on their way up to Scotland – and Inverness in particular before returning to Denham Film Studios for Treasure Island planning.

See below as Walt Disney chats on the set to Robert Newton

WALTDISNEY AND ROBERT NEWTON

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Peter Cushing as Mr Darcy 1952

We go back to early 1952 for this BBC Television adaptation of Pride and Prejudice in which Peter Cushing played Mr. Darcy – a play which would go out live in SIX episodes from 2 February 1952. In those days BBC was the ONLY channel available – and in my memory as a child, it provided very good and varied entertainment – although I do remember a performance of the opera Rigoletto which went out at what would now be called ‘peak time’ and we were less than impressed.

Peter Cushing in Pride and Prejudice 1952

 

It is a sobering thought in these days of mega money for the stars, that in a contract signed on 13 February 1952, it is revealed that Peter was paid just 28 Guineas for playing Mr. Darcy.

Peter went on the play in quite a number of BBC plays in the early fifties with his fee being 45 or 50 Guineas for each job he did. Things changed dramatically for his income when he was first cast in the Hammer Film The Curse of Frankenstein followed very quickly by Dracula and The Hound of the Baskervilles  – and then on an on in these very successful films.

Below – a picture of Peter busying himself at home – and to the right a picture of his beloved wife, Helen.

Peter Cushing at Home -Making earrings

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Wharf One Cafe in Cairns Australia – Interesting Film Show

 

WHARF ONE CAFE  - Cine Bar Cairns

Tonight’s silent film with live music accompaniment has been rescheduled until Wednesday April 5. 2017

Film Show in Cairns

Filmed in Tahiti in the 1920s, capturing the untouched beauty of the Pacific Islands.

Come for a mid-week sunset session on the inlet and enjoy the live music to black and white film experience.

This was the first film in which Leo the MGM lion, roared during the introduction.

Because there were no sound facilities in Hollywood, Douglas Shearer took the completed silent film to New Jersey, where he added a synchronized music score and sound effects.
Though the film’s credits claim it was shot on location in the Marquesas Islands with ‘authentic’ islanders, it was actually shot 900 miles away in Tahiti.
This was MGM’s first sound picture, and premiered in Hollywood at Sid Grauman’s Chinese Theatre on Friday, 3 Aug 1928.
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Chuck Berry

Chuck Berry’s songs, music and particularly lyrics defined and painted a picture of the USA that few of us knew at that time This was coupled with a driving beat with that superlative guitar intro to many of his songs. On top of this he was an original. When a Chuck Berry record came on the radio it needed no introduction. He was no doubt the founder of the Rock n Roll era and his influence continues. His songs that kicked off the Rock revolution were taken up a number of years later by the Beatles and The Rolling Stones and they formed the basis of their respective stage acts in their early days. He remains the most influential figure in music in my lifetime.

Chuck Berry

On 19th February 1967, I saw Chuck Berry top the bill – well of course he always did top the bill – at The Saville Theatre in London and supporting him that night and on the tour was Del Shannon. I saw the matinee – but in the evening performance the place went wild and some seats were wrecked. Apparently the fans wanted to see Chuck Berry and the lead up acts in between Del Shannon and him were not what they wanted. The Beatles were in the audience that night too.

Del Shannon and Chuck Berry February 1967

Del Shannon was very good – but Chuck Berry was on a different scale – probably the best  artist I have ever seen ‘Live’ and in concert. He was just sensational.

 

Another News Report below :

Del Shannon was also booked to appear at Brian Epstein’s Saville Theatre in London on a bill with Chuck Berry. John and Ringo attended the show on 19th February 1967. In 1987 Shannon made some recordings with George Harrison. Mysteriously, Shannon was found dead at his home in Santa Clarita, California, on 8th February 1990. He died of gunshot wounds, said to have been self-inflicted

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Connery Chappell

Connery Chappell (1908 – 1984)
ON MY PREVIOUS POST ABOUT THE PICTUREGOER FILM ANNUAL THE MAGAZINE EDITOR WAS A MR. CONNERY CHAPPELL. I HAD NO KNLOWLEDGE OF THIS MAN BUT IT SEEMS HE WAS A VERY TALENTED AND WELL CONNECTED PERSON IN THE FILM AND WRITING WORLD – AS FOLLOWS :- 

He was born in London in 1908. Connery started working as a theatre critic and journalist in pre-war time London, and worked for several newspapers including the Sunday Despatch. He fell ill with tuberculosis and had to spend the war recovering in a sanatorium on the Isle of Wight. But recover he did, and in the decade following the war he became the editor of two cinema magazines,The Kinematograph Weekly and The Picturegoer, and then as editor of Illusrated. Following this, in the mid-1950s, Connery became an Executive Film Producer for the Rank Organisation at Pinewood Studios. During his time with Rank he was involved in creating two crime drama series, Interpol Calling and Ghost Squad. In 1960 he set up his own company, Amlin Film Productions. Amlin produced several documentaries about the electricity and steam industries, in addition to making the film The Two Salisburys which compared the eponymous towns in the UK and Rhodesia.

 

Connery authored several fiction and non-fiction titles throughout his career. His most notable published title was his account of the lives of the internees on the Isle of Man during the 2nd World War entitled Island of Barbed Wire. His fictional writing included Trouble on the Line – a story of a mix-up at wayside railway station – and The Arrival of Master Jinks – the story of a doctor who discovers a drug that reduces the human gestation period from nine months to three months.

 

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Picturegoer Film Annual 1954-55

This is just the sort of Christmas Present children of the fifties would receive – and love to receive – as it contained hours of reading and news of the film stars and films that we were all waiting to see when they came around to the local cinemas.

Picturegoer Film Annual 1954-55

In this issue there were interesting articles on Audrey Hepburn, Norman Wisdom, Marilyn Monroe, Rhonda Fleming and many more PLUS a section on 3D which was in vogue at the time.

Pictures also of Robert Wagner, Grace Kelly, Gina Lollobridgida, Charlton Heston, Jack Palance – the list goes on.

Films featured included  Julius Caesar, Trouble in Store, The Glenn Miller Story, Tha Band Wagon, Doctor In  The House, From Here to Eternity plus features on Jack Hawkins, Debbie Reynolds, Janette Scott, Cyd Charisse and John  Wayne.

The last article is about the NEW Wide Screen process – which is headlined Wide Screen is Here To Stay – and so it proved to be – and we read of a number of films done in this process – King of the Khyber Rifles and Knights of The Round Table.

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A classic film Still – Victor Mature and Hedy Lamarr

This film is technically just outside of the Fifties being released in 1949 but a great film nonetheless – and starring two actors who were well able to add some zest to any production – and they certainly did in this one – Samson and Delilah.

Samson and Delilah

This lovely colour still is scanned from an old film annual of the time – and in those days whatever process they used I do not know but somehow the colour had a special brightness and sharpness that is very much of the era – difficult to say what it is but a sort of old fashioned classy look and eye catching too.

This is Victor Mature’s most memorable film and Hedy Lamarr’s too.

George Sanders,even in a biblical epic remains the original English scoundrel and gentleman!The acting of others is equally professional and convincing.Thr direction and editing is brilliant.

The later part of the film has a lot of passion and pathos with Victor Mature excelling as the blind Samson.   The destruction of the temple still evokes wonder and awe even after all these years and remains a very fine and enjoyable film – one of the best of its kind.

 

Film trailer as above

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Movie Memories Magazine

This is a great magazine – and has been running for a number of years now – based in North Lincolnshire England.

The examples below are quite old magazines but absolutely packed with articles and information / news on many films and actors.

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Please visit:       www.moviememoriesmagazine.com

 For £ 15 subscription you receive THREE editions each year – and each one is packed with film information spanning the Golden Days of Hollywood and the British Cinema. I cannot speak too highly of this superb publication and look forward to each new edition.

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By the Light of the Silvery Moon

My daughters used to love this film and having it on Video meant that  we watched it regularly.  Here again the Technicolor from the early Fifties is in my view is unsurpassed and this is shown to great effect in this film.

On saying that – the poster below is in Black and White so it certainly does not do justice to the Colour !!!

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Doris Day moving towards the peak of her career here and Gordon MacRae who never quite seemed to get top star billing that often – although he was in Carousel not long after this.

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